Featured Lodge: Mweya Safari Lodge

Mweya Safari Lodge enjoys stunning views from its location on a peninsula within the heart of the spectacular Queen Elizabeth National Park. Mweya Safari Lodge is the only lodge within the park boundaries and is a 5-minute drive from the start of the Kazinga Channel boat trips and game drive circuits. Due to its location, the lodge has some resident guests, including a couple of happy hippos, a family of warthogs and a large tribe of mongoose. Guests should be aware that these are wild animals even through they do appear to be well habituated to human presence.

Mweya Safari Lodge is also proud to be a partner in eco-tourism, and recently announced a joint project with USAID-funded STAR project (Sustainable Tourism in the Albertine Rift) to raise funds towards conservation education in schools neighboring the park in the wider area. Guests staying at Mweya can now, upon check in, tick a box contributing one U.S. dollar on their final bill, which will help fund the joint initiative. Coined “1 Dollar for the Future,” the funds collected will help to build a new school and support activities by the Wildlife Clubs of Uganda to educate students on the need for nature conservation to ensure sustainability in the future. Upon completion of the first school, a joint panel will then decide on additional projects for 2012 and beyond.

Mweya Safari Lodge has 49 rooms in total, with 32 standard rooms, 12 deluxe rooms and 2 suites. The rooms are arranged in smaller single story blocks, spreading out in both directions from the central main building which overlooks the Kazinga Channel and Lake Edward. Three types of cottages of various degrees of luxury are also available. Lodge amenities include a swimming pool, fitness center, the Kazinga Restaurant (serving international cuisine), the Tembo Safari Bar, an internet work place and a souvenir shop.

Photo Friday

A crocodile on the shore along the Kazinga Channel. Photo courtesy of Walter and Aleta Chossek.

The Hadza

Near Lake Eyasi, Tanzania lives an indigenous tribe whose lives have remained largely unchanged over the past 10,000 years.  The bush provides for all their needs and they are often willing for visitors to come and see their simple homes and way of life. Their language resembles the click languages of other Bushmen furher south in the Kalahari.

Our safaris to Tanzania often include visiting the Hadzabe people on a hunting or gathering walk (your choice based on your desired level of activity).

The December 2009 issue of National Geographic included the article, “The Hadza,” by Michael Finkel. It’s a fabulous article with excellent pictures of the tribe we can introduce you to on your next safari to Tanzania!

Photo Friday

Cheetahs out for breakfast

Featured Guide: Edward Kabagyo

Edward was born in the Hoima District in Western Uganda and is of the Munyoro tribe. He is happily married with three children.

Since his childhood Edward has had a keen interest in the fauna of Uganda. For the last 15 years, Edward has been involved in wildlife and conservation within Uganda. Edward started his career by working with young, orphaned or injured animals, but his speciality now is in mammals and reptiles. Over the numerous years of working in direct contact with a huge vari-ety of animal species, Edward has gathered an outstanding amount of knowledge on animal behaviour.

During game drives, Edward loves to inform you of the social structure of the variety of animal groups, their reproductive behaviour, their hunting strategies and techniques as well as numer-ous other interesting animal facts.

“Edward was FANTASTIC. We absolutely loved him. In addition to being a consummate professional he was incredibly attentive, caring and protective. I can’t say enough how much I appreciate the degree to which we always felt safe and secure when we were with him. He could not have treated us better and we always felt as though he was committed to going the extra mile in making sure we had the best trip possible. I cannot speak highly enough of him.”
~Steve Ruvolo June 2009

“… Another first rate/class piece of this for our family was our guide Edward Kabagyo. WHAT AN OUTSTANDING HUMAN BEING!!! After a couple days on the road, I really felt Edward took his job extremely seriously and had our best interest … Edward’s care for us was second to none. He always made sure we had what we needed. His patience was always present. His personality is calm, firm, committed, light hearted, funny, real, and friendly.”
~Julie David June 2010

Photo Friday

The Hadzabe provided us with a song and dance for entertainment.

Smelly Socks: Using Foot Odor to Fight Malaria

The key to avoiding malaria could be as close as your feet. That is, if they’re smelly enough. An entomologist in Tanzania has discovered that mosquitoes are attracted to the foot odor that naturally occurs from sweaty feet. Work is underway to design mosquito traps using stinky socks as bait, giving us all another reason to change our socks every day.

Photo Friday

Beautiful European Roller.
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