We Saw All Big Five at Sabi Sands

We left Cape Town yesterday for Sabi Sands, a private game reserve on the edge of Kruger National Park. The wildlife here is incredible. Within a few hours of arriving, I had already seen a herd of elephants, a pair of leopards mating, and two young rhinos.

Today, I saw hippos, a crocodile, lions, Cape buffalo bulls, giraffes, half dozen different kinds of antelope, and enough birds to fill a few pages of my notebook.

Internet is a little slow out here in the bush, so I’ve only been able to upload a few photos and videos from the past two days to Flickr, YouTube and Facebook. Please drop by those sites to browse the images.

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Featured Organization: Uganda Carnivore Program

lion pair uganda
lion on a rock uganda
Petra Kilian-Gehring took this photo of a lion on an Ujuzi safari to Uganda.

Lions, leopards, and hyenas are among the most popular charismatic mega fauna in the world.  Unfortunately, their populations have declined significantly over the past 200 years, due mainly to the growing needs of an expanding human population.  The Uganda Carnivore Program works to monitor and conserve important predators, working primarily inQueen Elizabeth National Park to find solutions that meet the needs of both wildlife and humans.

Read moreFeatured Organization: Uganda Carnivore Program

Good Fences Make Good Neighbors: Saving African Carnivores by Protecting Livestock

Photo by Diedre Leowinata/African People & Wildlife Fund A Maasai boy walks toward one of the boma’s houses; to his left is a Living Wall used to protect livestock from predators. Living Walls are environmentally friendly, predator-proof enclosures that combine fast-growing thorny trees as fence posts (a Maasai) with chain link fencing. The African People & Wildlife Fund helped develop, implement and monitor the effectiveness of the Living Walls and their impact on instances of human-wildlife conflict in Tanzania.
A Maasai boy walks toward one of the boma’s houses; to his left is a Living Wall used to protect livestock from predators. Living Walls are environmentally friendly, predator-proof enclosures that combine fast-growing thorny trees as fence posts (a Maasai innovation) with chain link fencing. The African People & Wildlife Fund helped develop, implement and monitor the effectiveness of the Living Walls and their impact on instances of human-wildlife conflict in Tanzania. Photo by Diedre Leowinata/African People & Wildlife Fund.

In last week’s post about a recent safari to Tanzania, we mentioned the “Living Walls” project, an effort to reduce conflicts between humans and big cats in the Maasai Steppe. Named after the Maasai ethnic group, the Maasai Steppe is an area in northeastern Tanzania that encompasses both Tarangire and Lake Manyara National Parks and is home to diverse wildlife as well as a longstanding human population. (Here’s a map of the Maasai Steppe.)

Raising cattle and goats is a major livelihood among the Maasai. At night when the herds are not out grazing, their owners traditionally keep them in circular pens fenced in by dead acacia thorns. The thorns can deter predators, but they aren’t foolproof, because they degrade easily in the harsh sun. Each Maasai community in the Steppe experiences carnivore attacks on livestock in these traditional pens about 50 times a year, resulting in the deaths of 72-84 lions across the Steppe as herders seek to protect their livestock.

Living Walls are a better approach developed together by Maasai communities and the African Wildlife & People Fund. Living Walls are based on the traditional acacia pen, but use fast-growing native trees and chainlink as reinforcement. This makes it very difficult for a predator to jump over or break through the pen.

Photo by Diedre Leowinata/African People & Wildlife Fund Livestock contained within a Living Wall. Living Walls are environmentally friendly, predator-proof enclosures that combine fast-growing thorny trees as fence posts (a Maasai innovation) with chain link fencing. The African People & Wildlife Fund helped develop, implement and monitor the effectiveness of the Living Walls and their impact on instances of human-wildlife conflict in Tanzania.
Photo by Diedre Leowinata/African People & Wildlife Fund. Goats protected by a Living Wall.

Living Walls dramatically decrease predator attacks on livestock, and thus also virtually eliminate killing of predators by humans. From 2003 to 2013, Living Walls had a 99.9% success rate at deterring nighttime predator attacks, and herders with Living Walls didn’t kill any predators.

Because the fences rely largely on abundant natural resources, they are a practical, cost-effective solution to what up until now seemed like an intractable problem on the Maasai Steppe.

Would you like to learn more? Check out the links below:

Photo by Diedre Leowinata/African People & Wildlife Fund Two children walk along a well-trodden track around the Living Wall in their family’s boma. Living Walls are environmentally friendly, predator-proof enclosures that combine fast-growing thorny trees as fence posts (a Maasai innovation) with chain link fencing. The African People & Wildlife Fund helped develop, implement and monitor the effectiveness of the Living Walls and their impact on instances of human-wildlife conflict in Tanzania.
Two children walk along a well-trodden track around the Living Wall in their family’s boma. Photo by Diedre Leowinata/African People & Wildlife Fund.
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